Introvert Poetry #1

Introvert Poem #1

 

You have to get the timing right

between going

                               and

                                      gone.

Say goodbye, and then step in for

the hug

opening your arms

(to

.           .enfold.)

But if they move away

    just before

or dig for their keys

the moment is

.                           gone.

And then what can you do?

.     (ask

.     for a

.     hug?)

.          No,

.     you go

without.

 

Top Ten Tues: Series to Start

Top Ten Tuesdays are hosted by The Broke and The Bookish, and feature lists related to all things bookish–characters, authors, titles, and favorites. They’re an excellent way to find new interesting books on a variety of topics, and to find bloggers that love the books you do.

Check out their blog for their top ten and lists of other bloggers who participate.

June 20:  Top Ten Series I’ve Been Meaning To Start But Haven’t (topic originally done March 2013) — anyone else have a mile long list of series to start like I do??

I actually divide my TBR into “series I’ve started/ stand-alones” and “series I haven’t,” in the hopes of finishing something. Some of them have been waiting for years!

1. Throne of the Crescent Moon; Saladin Ahmed.

2. White Cat; Holly Black.

3. Passenger; Alexandra Bracken.

4. The Gods of Gotham; Lyndsay Faye.

5. The Wicked & The Divine; Kieron Gillen.

6. Those Who Hunt the Night; Barbara Hambly.

7. Illusive; Emily Lloyd-Jones.

8. The Rook; Daniel O’Malley.

9. Princess of Wands; John Ringo.

10. The Final Empire; Brandon Sanderson.

 

Weekend Writing Warriors: 6/17

This 8-10 sentence blog hop is hosted by The Weekend Writing Warriors. (Click the link for the list of participants, or rules if you want to join!)

This is a WIP, NaNoWriMo 2016, currently called River, Tree, Mountain. It’s science fiction, set on a colony planet, six generations in–with about 10% of the population born “marvels,” who have special abilities like dowsing, healing, or creating fire. The protagonist, Rekka, is a spark (fire), signed a contract with Brenton to provide him a child, and traveled to be met with an empty apartment and a message saying he’s away on business–a few days later he returns, makes breakfast, and after work takes her to the testing center, where they flirt and kiss, then Rekka tests for quantity of ignition points, then accuracy of targeting, range, and gets her results–and Ruby lies, saying a move from a weak 2 to a strong 3 isn’t a big deal, which Brenton doesn’t correct.

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Rekka wasn’t sure why Brenton had allowed Ruby to lie to her, but it was possible that he wasn’t aware of how big a lie it was. And she knew he put his company first, which he’d been more than honest about. His loyalty to her was true, but secondary.

Over time, she might earn more of his trust, but she’d never equal that of a lifetime of alliances and memories, not when every company child was told to put them first, and no others. Perhaps she could have the second largest share of Brenton’s heart, and that would be enough.

As they drove home, Brenton got a message, which he ignored, but as soon as he parked the car, he pulled his phone to check it. “Work,” he said.

“I understand,” Rekka smiled at him to show she meant it, “My job has confidential information, too.”

“I’ll just be a minute,” Brenton promised, dropping a kiss on her cheek before stepping into his home office.

*    *    *

Life on the colony planet of Kaibou was going uneventfully until the second generation of colonists was born on the planet, at some, at a young age, began showing various psychic abilities. When those people, called marvels, grew up, many of them formed companies, building compounds to live in and raise their children.  Due to population diversity issues, many colonists have children using genetic bank material, or choose a succession of partners. Now on the seventh generation, marvels are born both within and without company walls, and all must work together to use their gifts and make a living on a still wild land. Some of these outsider marvels sign contracts with company marvels, agreeing to give them a child raised within the company, in return for a permanent home in the company compound, a stipend, and other concessions.

Top Ten Tues: Fathers

Top Ten Tuesdays are hosted by The Broke and The Bookish, and feature lists related to all things bookish–characters, authors, titles, and favorites. They’re an excellent way to find new interesting books on a variety of topics, and to find bloggers that love the books you do.

Check out their blog for their top ten and lists of other bloggers who participate.

June 13: Father’s Day related Freebiefavorite dads in literature, best father/daughter or son relationships, books to buy your dad, worst dads in literature, etc. etc.

Here’s my Top Ten Favorite Fathers in Literature.

1. City of Miracles; Robert Jackson Bennet. Sometimes fatherhood is sad.

2. Barrayar; Lois McMaster Bujold. It’s tough raising the emperor, and a fragile son at the same time.

3. The Fantastic Mr. Fox; Roald Dahl. He’s fantastic!

4. Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close; Jonathan Foer. Even dads not present can have a big effect.

5. Anansi Boys; Neil Gaiman. He’s a terrible father, but entertaining!

6. The World’s Strongest Librarian; Josh Hanagarne. Father and father figures in this one.

7. To Kill a Mockingbird; Harper Lee. We won’t talk about the sequel.

8. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone; J.K. Rowling. So many good kinds of dads in these books. Hagrid is a favorite of mine.

9. Holes; Louis Sachar. He gets points for trying.

10. The Book Thief; Marcus Zusak. Foster dads count, too.

 

Weekend Writing Warriors: 6/10

This 8-10 sentence blog hop is hosted by The Weekend Writing Warriors. (Click the link for the list of participants, or rules if you want to join!)

This is a WIP, NaNoWriMo 2016, currently called River, Tree, Mountain. It’s science fiction, set on a colony planet, six generations in–with about 10% of the population born “marvels,” who have special abilities like dowsing, healing, or creating fire. The protagonist, Rekka, is a spark (fire), signed a contract with Brenton to provide him a child, and traveled to be met with an empty apartment and a message saying he’s away on business–a few days later he returns, makes breakfast, and after work takes her to the testing center, where they flirt and kiss, then Rekka tests for quantity of ignition points, then accuracy of targeting, range, and gets her results.

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“This is unusual,” Ruby said, “Rekka, we’d labeled you as a strong two, but it looks as if you’re actually a weak three.”

“She is?” Brenton asked.

“I am?” Rekka asked at the same time, her words tangling with his.

“Yes, the better testing just put you over, but it’s nothing to worry over. You haven’t really gone from a two to a three, but just increased a small amount, that happens to have changed your numbers.”

“Okay, then,” Rekka let her shoulders sag just a little, but her mind was racing behind her relieved, polite smile. She knew that the difference between a ‘strong two’ and a ‘weak three’ wasn’t a small amount as Ruby had just claimed.

The distance between each level widened as you went, so there was a small distance between a one and a two, a fair amount from a two to a three, and a vast gulf between a four and a five. She didn’t know if she’d faced very poor testing and been badly mislabeled, or her power had grown since her last testing. All she knew for certain was that Ruby had lied to her, Brenton wasn’t protesting that lie, even though he had to know better, and she couldn’t trust the Sofias as well as she’d hoped.

*    *    *

Life on the colony planet of Kaibou was going uneventfully until the second generation of colonists was born on the planet, at some, at a young age, began showing various psychic abilities. When those people, called marvels, grew up, many of them formed companies, building compounds to live in and raise their children.  Due to population diversity issues, many colonists have children using genetic bank material, or choose a succession of partners. Now on the seventh generation, marvels are born both within and without company walls, and all must work together to use their gifts and make a living on a still wild land. Some of these outsider marvels sign contracts with company marvels, agreeing to give them a child raised within the company, in return for a permanent home in the company compound, a stipend, and other concessions.

There’s a Story Here

Ever see something while you’re out in the strange, strange world, and think–“there’s a story here?” Some reason why a thing is what it is, but you’ll never know why exactly?

This was one of those moments.

This is a very angry sign, as shown by the use of caps and bold. But someone took the time to add in that little clip art with the purple flowers, which is a nice, if slightly odd touch. So, someone cut down a plant. Why? Who knows?

And why did the gardener decide to put up this sign? Presumably to let the plant killer know what they’d done.

Did it work? Maybe.

But it made me laugh. That wasn’t it’s intended purpose, but life is a weird place.

Stay strange!

Top Ten Tues: TBR

Top Ten Tuesdays are hosted by The Broke and The Bookish, and feature lists related to all things bookish–characters, authors, titles, and favorites. They’re an excellent way to find new interesting books on a variety of topics, and to find bloggers that love the books you do.

Check out their blog for their top ten and lists of other bloggers who participate.

June 6:  10 Books From X Genre That I’ve Recently Added To My TBR ListI want to know what books have piqued your interest lately from whatever genre you choose!

Ten Ten Sci Fi/ Fantasy Books That I’ve Recently Added to my TBR

1. The Furthest Station; Ben Aaronovitch. Magic police in London, doing their best.

2. The Language of Thorns; Leigh Bardugo. Dark fairytales.

3. Ladycastle; Delilah Dawson. Lady heroes.

4. Indigo; Charlaine Harris, Christopher Golden, et al. Some cool authors in this book.

5. A Peace Divided; Tanya Huff. Torin Kerr is just awesome.

6. Shadowsong; S. Jae-Jones. Goblin Market inspired book, part 2.

7. A Scandal in Battersea; Mercedes Lackey. Sherlock Holmes… and Elemental magic.

8. Redder Than Blood; Tanith Lee. Vampire Snow White? Sold!

9. Down Among the Sticks and Bones; Seanan McGuire. A Home for Wayward Children… children with stories to tell.

10. The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O; Neal Stephenson. Because I like the author.

Weekend Writing Warriors: 6/3

This 8-10 sentence blog hop is hosted by The Weekend Writing Warriors. (Click the link for the list of participants, or rules if you want to join!)

This is a WIP, NaNoWriMo 2016, currently called River, Tree, Mountain. It’s science fiction, set on a colony planet, six generations in–with about 10% of the population born “marvels,” who have special abilities like dowsing, healing, or creating fire. The protagonist, Rekka, is a spark (fire), signed a contract with Brenton to provide him a child, and traveled to be met with an empty apartment and a message saying he’s away on business–a few days later he returns, makes breakfast, and after work takes her to the testing center, where they flirt and kiss, then Rekka tests for quantity of ignition points, then accuracy of targeting (which I skipped over), and is taking a break, tired from the test.

weekend_writing_warriorsveteransbadge

“You feeling alright, my dear?” Brenton asked, watching her over his phone’s holoscreen.

“Yes, I’m fine, but no one’s really made me reach this hard,” Rekka glanced at Ruby, who was furiously imputing something on her tablet, “Which does say something about your testing facilities–you know what you’re doing.”

Brenton closed the projection, and stepped behind her, rubbing her shoulders, “Don’t let her push you too hard, though.”

“Certainly,” she leaned into his capable hands.

“You ready, Rekka?” Ruby called.

Rekka sighed piteously, drained the rest of her water, and stood, “You stay ready with those magic hands of yours.”

“Will do,” Brenton said, with a wicked smile, “My magic hands are yours to command.”

“I don’t have time to flirt with you right now,” Rekka shook her head, and hurried off.

“Last one, then we’re finished,” Ruby said.

*    *    *

Life on the colony planet of Kaibou was going uneventfully until the second generation of colonists was born on the planet, at some, at a young age, began showing various psychic abilities. When those people, called marvels, grew up, many of them formed companies, building compounds to live in and raise their children.  Due to population diversity issues, many colonists have children using genetic bank material, or choose a succession of partners. Now on the seventh generation, marvels are born both within and without company walls, and all must work together to use their gifts and make a living on a still wild land. Some of these outsider marvels sign contracts with company marvels, agreeing to give them a child raised within the company, in return for a permanent home in the company compound, a stipend, and other concessions.

Book Riot Read Harder: May

And the Book Riot Read Harder Challenge is here again! There’s 24 prompts to encourage you to read harder, and I urge you to check it out if you want to get outside your comfort zone. 🙂

(Click the link to see the challenge, and to download a PDF of the challenge list.)

book riot

To quote the article: “We encourage you to push yourself, to take advantage of this challenge as a way to explore topics or formats or genres that you otherwise wouldn’t try. But this isn’t a test. […] We like books because they allow us to see the world from a new perspective, and sometimes we all need help to even know which perspectives to try out.”

  • Read a book about war.

When Books Went to War; Molly Manning.

The story of books provided to the military during WWII, included special editions printed to fit in the pocket.

This book, like a lot of books about real events, is a mix of tragic and hopeful. During WWII, 100 million books were burned, and many people, military and civilian, died. But the US also worked together to send 120 million special lightweight paperbacks to the troops. And those books saved and changed lives, as well as having a sweeping effect on the publishing world. A little piece of home, a reminder of what they fought for, an escape from battle conditions–the books that went to war were a lot of things, as good books are.

A short, but thorough read, the books covers a lot of details, including a list of every title published at the end. Sadly, there’s more than a little in-fighting and blame shifting going on, but overall, the country did fairly well with these portable and tough little books (though they did suffer quite a lot of abuse). And reading the results afterwards, when all these men took that new love of reading home, often to further their educations, is uplifting to any reader.

  • Read a book set in Central or South America, written by a Central or South American author.

The House of Spirits; Isabel Allende.

Allende is from Chile, and the book is set in “an unnamed South American country.”

This is a complicated one–it’s about three generations of a family, focusing on Esteban Trueba, his wife Clara, their children, and grandchildren, as well as Trueba’s illegitimate offspring. Trueba builds a grand house for his family, and works his land, and to some degree takes care of the people who work for him–there’s love and war as time goes on, and the things he builds fall apart. Trueba speaks for himself, often in flashbacks, telling how his story ends–and he does a lot of excusing his behavior, and claiming his goodness, which got on my nerves. He isn’t, in my opinion, all that good, but some of the people around him are. The story is lyrical and complex, and at times a difficult read, but others quite fascinating if you have the patience for a slow book.

I didn’t like this one as much as I hoped, mostly because I didn’t like Trueba, and because of the way it’s told–with plenty of foreshadowing–I knew bad things would happen to good people, and nothing much to bad people. But it’s a lovely book, so your mileage may vary!

Top Ten Tues: Second Half 2017

Top Ten Tuesdays are hosted by The Broke and The Bookish, and feature lists related to all things bookish–characters, authors, titles, and favorites. They’re an excellent way to find new interesting books on a variety of topics, and to find bloggers that love the books you do.

Check out their blog for their top ten and lists of other bloggers who participate.

May 30: Top Ten Most Anticipated Books For The Second Half of 2017

These are books I most look forward to out of the ones I plan to read in the second half of the year.

1. White Hot; Ilona Andrews. Can’t wait to see more of Nevada and Rogan’s relationship. The authors do a great job of developing a believable and touching romance, every time.

2. City of Miracles; Robert Jackson Bennett. The end of a trilogy of a war waged against the gods, with some truly stunning characters.

3. Ash & Quill; Rachel Caine. Books about books (libraries, writers, bookstores) are always my favorites.

4. The Boy on the Bridge; M.R. Carey. More thought provoking zombie books, please! The Girl with all the Gifts was the perfect amount of creepy, so I need to read this, too.

5. A Peace Divided; Tanya Huff. There is no such thing as too much Torin Kerr.

6. Godsgrave; Jay Kristoff. The first book in this series really hooked me, and I can’t wait to see where it goes next.

7. The Brightest Fell; Seanan McGuire. A great urban fantasy series. Love Toby and all her crew so much.

8. All the Crooked Saints; Maggie Stiefvater. There’s nothing by this author I disliked–and plenty of books I loved.

9. Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them; (screenplay) J.K. Rowling. How is it that I haven’t read this yet?

10. Artemis; Andrew Weir. I really enjoyed The Martian, so I’m curious to see what he comes up with next.